OSyM Participants

    • Type of Researcher
    Members
    Jesse Garrett-Larsen
    Organismal Biologist
    Graduate Student
    Virginia Tech
    Hawley Lab
    jessegl@vt.edu
    Research Summary

    I am an organismal biologist studying ecoimminology. Specifically, I study how cold temperatures affect physiological responses to infection with a bacterial pathogen. I would like to learn how to use these data to parameterize models predicting disease spread within populations in variable climates.


    Biographical Info

    I am a third year graduate student at Virginia Tech pursuing my PhD.


    Cameron Ghalambor
    Organismal Biologist
    Professor
    Colorado State University
    cameron1@colostate.edu
    The Ghalambor Lab
    Twitter
    Research Summary

    I consider myself an integrative evolutionary ecologist. I'm interested in questions at the intersection of evolution, ecology, physiology, and behavior. I'm particularly interested in the ecological and evolutionary consequences of phenotypic plasticity, the role of phenotypic integration in constraining and facilitating adaptive evolution, trade-offs between physiological tolerance and biotic interactions, and the determinants of vulnerability to climate change. My lab works on fish, birds, insects, and amphibians depending on the question.


    Biographical Info

    B.A. University of California, Los Angeles 1991
    PhD University of Montana 1998
    Post-doc University of California, Riverside 1999-2003
    Assistant Professor, Colorado State University 2003-2009
    Associate Professor, Colorado State University, 2009-2015
    Professor, Colorado State University, 2015-present


    Jordan Glass
    Organismal Biologist
    Graduate student
    Arizona State University
    Arizona State University
    jrglass@asu.edu
    Research Summary

    My research interests are in environmental physiology. Specifically, uncovering and understanding the different physiological mechanisms of insects that allow them to live in hostile environments and whether these phylogenetically-constrained adaptations are sufficient for them to persist in a changing world.


    Biographical Info

    Earned an associates degree (science) from Mesa Community College (2014), a bachelors degree (biological sciences: animal behavior and physiology) from Arizona State University (2016), a masters degree (biology) from the University of the Pacific (2018), and is currently working on a PhD (biology) in the lab of Dr. Jon Harrison (insect physiology) at Arizona State University (expected 2023).

    My love of environmental physiology is linked to childhood hikes with his botanist grandpa, attending an Introductory Biology course taught by a passionate, enthusiastic community college professor, and participating in ASU’s Fundamentals of Tropical Biology study abroad program at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Gamboa, Panama as an undergraduate.


    Daniel Grünbaum
    Engineer, Modeler, Organismal Biologist
    Professor
    University of Washington
    School of Oceanography,
    random@uw.edu
    Research Summary

    My interests revolve around understanding quantitative relationships between organismal traits and ecological dynamics at larger spatial, temporal and organizational scales. Many of my projects involve spatial ecology and movement, from the perspectives of trophic interactions, behavior, biomechanics, using a combination of laboratory observations, field instrumentation and analytical and mathematical modeling.


    Keywords: biological oceanography, mathematical ecology, biomechanics, larval biology
    John Guittar
    Modeler, Organismal Biologist
    Dr.
    Michigan State University
    guittarj@gmail.com

    Twitter
    Research Summary

    Broadly, I am a community ecologist who uses ecological theory and statistical modeling to link observed community patterns to underlying processes. More specifically, I am interested in the assembly and services of host-associated microbial communities, such as those in mammalian guts and on the roots and leaves of plants. Conceptually, my current research falls into three general areas: (A) patterns and processes of host-associated microbial succession; (B) host-microbiome feedbacks and alternative stable states, especially those triggered by pathogens to enable their rapid expansion; and (C) microbial community resistance and resilience to disturbance and immigration.


    Biographical Info

    I am currently a postdoctoral researcher at Michigan State University, co-advised by Ashley Shade, Elena Litchman, and (unofficially) Chris Klausmeier. I work on various projects related to the microbial ecology of the human gut. I also spend time working on projects related to microbial resistance to disease, and general community ecology theory. I did my dissertation at University of Michigan in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, which focused on trying understand and predict how grasslands will respond to climate change. Before that, I spent several years traveling and working public service jobs in Namibia, Ecuador, and Colombia. I did my undergraduate at Grinnell College.


    Emily Hall
    Organismal Biologist
    Postdoctoral Researcher
    Vanderbilt University Medical Center
    emily.m.hall@vanderbilt.edu
    Research Summary

    I study developmental plasticity and immunity trade-offs in amphibians.


    Biographical Info

    As a conservation physiologist, I’m interested in understanding how organisms cope with change.


    Rehan Ul Haq
    Modeler, Organismal Biologist
    Assistant Professor
    University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan
    Department of Wildlife and Ecology
    rehan.haq@uvas.edu.pk
    Website
    Twitter
    Research Summary

    Quantitative Ecology
    Effects of environmental changes on wildlife - In fact, my Ph.D. research was on the effects of climatic, hydrological, and land-use changes on waterbirds
    Wildlife population models


    Biographical Info

    I am working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Wildlife and Ecology, University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan. My undergraduate degree is Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) from University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore Pakistan. LaterI did M. Phil. in Wildlife and Ecology from the same university. In Dec, 2018, I completed PhD from the Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand.In 2016, I completed an Erasmus+ mobility at University of Granada, Spain. I have worked with Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)at the Regional Office of the Asia and Pacific (Bangkok, Thailand) , AIT Solutions (A research and business center of AIT), and as a visiting lecturer at the Mahidol University International College (MUIC), Thailand. My research interests are wildlife ecology, statistical modelling, wildlife behavior, forestry, and wildlife crimes. I am trained in wildlife modeling techniques using R statistical software.


    Cheryl Hayashi
    Organismal Biologist
    Curator, Professor, and Leon Hess Director of Comparative Biology Research
    American Museum of Natural History
    chayashi@amnh.org
    Biographical Info

    Cheryl Hayashi is a Hawaii-born biologist who is curator, professor, and Director of Comparative Biology Research at the American Museum of Natural History. She specializes in the genetic structure of spider silk. A Yale alumnus, she was previously a professor at University California Riverside, and was a 2007 MacArthur Fellow.


    Keywords: spiders, silk, gene family, functional genomics, proteomics
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